INVESTEC CT ART FAIR 2019: MARK MAKING

INVESTEC CT ART FAIR 2019: MARK MAKING

Mark making is the unique, expressive mark an artist makes, or uses to create their own distinct piece of work. Some artist’s mark making is so intrinsically them, that you can spot their work from a mile away.

Mark making can add to the visual or story line. It can be emotive, dark and full of angst, or light and ethereal. It can be playful, frivolous and fun. It can be part of text or just plain texture and mark-making can happen in any medium. Whatever it is, it brings interest and wonder to the work.

WE HAVE CHOSEN 3 ARTISTS TO SHOWCASE:

Note: All their names are hyperlinked if you want to read more about them or see more of their work.

A. Dawit Abebe (Ethiopia)

One of the first artists we looked at as we entered the exhibition immediately set the tone. We were going to see loads of quality work. Dawit’s mark making is raw and organic and his attention to detail in the hands is pure magic. We stared at his work for some time taking in his understanding of the human form. We really loved his 2 pieces: ‘Mutual Identity 12′ and ‘Mutual Identity 14′, both 700 x 1000mm, pastel on paper.

B. Ley Mboramwe (Democratic Republic of Congo)

In complete contrast, Ley’s work is bright, energetic and executed in acrylic paint on canvas. Although his mark making, in both pieces below, is frenetic and done in layers, his work is playful and amusing. There is a strong use of colour and the viewer gets the feeling he is so impassioned to tell a story that his own excitement takes over his mark making – like psychobabble in paint. We loved it. The two paintings are entitled: ‘Atandele’ and ‘Le Peuple Gangne’ respectively.

C. Evans Mbugua (Kenya)

Although born in Kenya, Evans now lives and works in Paris. His 2 pieces caught our eye as they were completely different to anything else we had seen. He definitely has his own, very distinctive mark making technique. Evans works in oil on perspex which he places on top of photo paper, the latter reminding us of perhaps a print from fabric. His mark making is done in tiny dots of oil paint on BOTH sides of the perspex creating an extra sense of depth that would not be caught otherwise. His work is charming and happy and it reflects a kind of innocence rarely seen in a lot works these days.

Below are both close ups of ‘So Far So Good’ and ‘Mteja Amepatikana‘.

As you can see, the variety of artwork on display was amazing and it really got us motivated to experiment more with mark making. It would be so satisfying to make a particular mark one’s own. It might take years for that to happen, and the journey getting there may be messy, but it will be loads of fun.

HELP: After hours of extensive searches, we were unable to trace the artist of the featured picture of this blog. We both loved it, so if anyone can help, it would be most appreciated. This artist needs the recognition.

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  • “Every day in every way we are leaving our mark.” – Rachael Bermingham

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NOTE: We would like to state that we are not professional art critics! We, love all kinds of art and we love to share our experiences, picks and preferences and make comments on them.



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