McNay Museum: PORTRAITS

McNay Museum: PORTRAITS

The McNay Museum in Texas is home to a cornucopia of modern art which is a feast to behold. In this posting, I will be sharing some of the portraits that were on display.

FOR DIFFERENT REASONS, HERE ARE A FEW THAT CAUGHT MY EYE:

Names of artists have been hyperlinked for more information about the artist.

(Left)
Harold Wood (1948)
‘Self Portrait 2’ (2008) – Acrylic on Canvas

(Middle)
Benny Andrews (1930 – 2006)
‘The Cop’ (1968) – Oil on Canvas & Fabric Collage

(Right)
Paul Cezanne (1839 – 1906)
‘Portrait of Henri Gasquet’ (circa 1896)


These 3 male portraits have all been rendered by different artists in completely different ways. It’s amazing how various techniques can enhance the look and personality of the sitter. In Wood’s self-portrait, he appears serious and formidable, while Andrew’s technique suggests aggression & grit, often associated or stereotypical of what policeman project. Gauguin’s portrait, however, is softer. One could almost hear the sitter’s gentle voice and smell his tobacco which has, over years, permeated his jacket.
(Left)
Amedeo Modigiliani (1884 – 1920)
‘Girl With Blue Eyes’ (1918) – Oil on Canvas

(Middle)
Raoul Dufy (1877 – 1953)
‘Seated Woman – Rosalie’ (1929) – Oil on Canvas

(Right)
Henri Matisse (1869 – 1954)
‘The Red Blouse’ (1936) – Oil on Canvas


Here are 3 completely different portraits of women. Modigliani’s simple, almost flat portrait borders on being graphic and displays a sense of innocence which is caught in her watery, blue eyes, while Dufy’s loose-lined painting has a relaxed feeling, the model seems comfortable posing nude and in Matisse’s painting, the model appears confident, almost forthright, which is enhanced by the bold use of red.
(Left)
Alexej Jawlensky (1864 – 1941)
‘Mystical Heads: Niobe’ – Encaustic on Board

(Middle)
Georges Rouault (1871 – 1958)
‘The Dancer’ (1937) – Oil on Canvas

(Right)
Pablo Picasso (1881 – 1973)
‘Woman With Plumed Hat’ (1901) – Oil on Canvas


Jawlensky, a Russian expressionist has captured sadness or disdain in a just a few brushstrokes, while Rouault’s portrait is made up of a multitude of small, thick brushstrokes, which in complete contrast, depicts the daintiness of a dancer. Picasso’s portrait looks more like a Renoir than a Picasso-esque portrait. I was quite taken aback in the most wonderful way. The saying ‘You learn something every day’ was definitely on the nose when it came to my reaction to this painting: Picasso being one of my favourite artists of all time.

There were many more portraits by famous artists and they were all beautifully displayed in this very modern gallery which I highly recommend to any art enthusiast.

FOR MORE INFO ON THE MCNAY MUSEUM: CLICK HERE

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  • “When I know your soul, I will paint your eyes.” – Amedeo Modigliani

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NOTE: We would like to state that we are not professional art critics! We, love all kinds of art and we love to share our experiences, picks and preferences and make comments on them.



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